Sources for Acquiring Accessible Educational Materials  (AEM) in Nevada

Where to Acquire Accessible Educational Materials (AEM)
Though not exhaustive, options for acquiring accessible educational materials include:

  • Publishers and other Commercial Options
  • Clark or Washoe County Repositories
  • Bookshare
  • Learning Ally
  • National Instructional Materials Access Center
  • Louis Database of Accessible Materials and APH Repository
  • Public Domain Options
  • District Personnel Creates with District Resources and Publisher Permission

Not all materials will be available in the specialized format required and districts may need to create the materials. Districts are encouraged to seek advice from their legal counsel if this is necessary to ensure compliance with copyright obligations.

 

Copyright Criteria
The
acquisition flow charts should be used to guide IEP or multi-disciplinary in their considerations of copyright criteria.

Based on Copyright criteria, the following sources may be considered during the acquisition process: 

  • District resources should be checked to determine if an accessible format of the book was purchased and is available for the student.  A purchased accessible book can be used by any student. That is, it doesn't have to be reserved for the sole use of a student with a print disability.   If publishers produce digital materials that are accessible and can be purchased for use by any student, districts are encouraged to purchase them.  This aligns with existing educational initiatives, including Differentiated Instruction, and Universal Design for Learning (UDL).  It also allows teachers to spend their time on instruction versus creating accessible materials.
  • Students that meet criteria for IDEA and the Copyright Act of 1931 as amended can acquire materials from any source:
    a. Specialized formats derived from NIMAS files acquired from the NIMAC
    b. Accessible Media Producers (e.g. Bookshare, Learning Ally, etc.)
    c. Publishers
    d. Commercial Options
         
    e. Public Domain Options 
    f.  Created with district resources (Under the Chafee Amendment or with publisher permission)
  • Students that meet Copyright Act of 1931 as amended can acquire materials from all sources except from NIMAS file sets:
    a. Accessible Media Producers (e.g. Bookshare, Learning Ally, APH, etc.)
    b. Publishers
    c. Commercial Options 
    d. Public domain options not protected by copyright 
    e. Create with district resources (Under the Chafee Amendment or with publisher permission)
  • Students who do not meet criteria for copyright, but require accessible instructional materials to meet IDEA requirements for a free, appropriate public education (FAPE) can acquire materials from:
    a. Publishers
    b. Commercial Options 
    c. Public domain options not protected by copyright
    d. Create with district resources and publisher permission

Description of Selected Sources

The National Instructional Materials Access Center (NIMAC) http://www.nimac.us/ 

• Free federally-funded, national electronic file repository 
• Provides National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard (NIMAS) XML based source files
• Available for core print instructional materials
• Need to download the file and then convert and produce the specialized format required by the student
• Available only for students who have an IEP and meet criteria for copyright exemption
• Search the NIMAC for book files -
http://www.nimac.us/ >enter the repository > search the NIMAC
• The authorized user and service in your area should be contacted to download or assign files 
to  an accessible media producer. The following are authorized users for the NIMAC:

    • Clark County School District Vision Services
      Brenda Barran  bdbarran@interact.ccsd.net
    • Washoe County School District Assistive Technology Services
      Jennifer Whalley   jwhalley@washoeschools.net
       
    • Washoe County School District Vision Services
      David Scherer  david.scherer@washoeschools.net
    • Nevada Special Education Technology Assistance Project
      All other local educational agencies (rural districts and charter schools)
      Liz Isaacs  nsetap@aol.com 

 Clark County and Washoe County Repositories

• Resources that produces Braille books for students with vision impairments within these two counties. 
• Large database with hundreds of previously produced books available in an electronic format and 
some available in embossed Braille.
• Contacts:
Clark County School District Vision Services - Brenda Barran  bdbarran@interact.ccsd.net
 
Washoe County School District Vision Services - David Scherer  david.scherer@washoeschools.net


Louis Database of Accessible Materials and APH Repository http://www.aph.org

  • Contains information on approximately 379,862 titles in accessible formats, including braille, large print, sound recording and electronic files.
  • Searchable database for viewing the availability of books for titles and formats available for purchase.
  • Registration and provide appropriate documentation of a disability required.
  • Provides the availablity of the source/format of he book, the description and book details, information on how to otain the book.   

Bookshare   www.bookshare.org

  • Free for qualified U.S. students and schools
  • Fee based for other individual memberships
  • Online library of digital materials (books, textbooks, newspapers) for individuals with print disabilities
  • Registration and provide appropriate documentation of a disability required
  • Materials are read using adaptive technology, software that reads the book aloud (text-to-speech), and/or displays the book on a computer screen or Braille access devices

Learning Ally    www.learningally.org

  • Fee based membership service
  • Provides audio textbooks and literature titles read by natural voice readers (not computers)
  • Access is available for students who qualify as visually impaired, or have a learning disabilityCan be used on mainstream technology like MP 3 player, Ipod, Ipad, as well as specialized assistive technology devices

Publishers or Commercial Options
Some publishers of instructional materials are now making their materials available in digital format.  If a publisher has a specialized format of a copyrighted material, such as a textbook or contemporary novel, available for sale, it can be purchased and used by any student. That is, it doesn't have to be reserved for the sole use of a student with a print disability.  This supports all students who may struggle with obtaining information contained in  print materials.  If publishers produce digital materials that are accessible and can be purchased for use by any student with a print disability.  Districts are encouraged to purchase such materials to align with existing educational initiatives, including Differentiated Instruction, and Universal Design for Learning (UDL). 

Public Domain
Works in the public domain may be freely copied, used, and redistributed. As a result, the World Wide Web has become a voluminous host to public domain works, particularly classics of literature. Students can access this content on the Web and customize in multiple ways (e.g., font, size, contrast) or having the text read aloud via speech synthesis

Accessible Education Materials Guide to Authorized Media Producers (AMPs)
http://aem.cast.org/search?query=AMP
The User’s Guide to Federally Funded Accessible Media Producers provides detailed and “at-a-glance” format of in-depth information about the three federally funded accessible media producers—Bookshare, Learning Ally, and the American Printing House for the Blind (APH). The Guide includes each organization's role, available resources, information on students served, and detailed step-by-step instructions on how to access those resources